resmed new record

ResMed New Record: One Billion Nights of Sleep Data Monitored

ResMed new record in digital connected care: One billion nights of sleep data have been downloaded using ResMed’s remote patient monitoring platform, AirView.

“One billion isn’t just a big number,” says Atul Malhotra, MD, chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and director of Sleep Medicine at UC San Diego Health, in a release. “It’s a major milestone that holds great promise for future research and the treatment of sleep apnea and other respiratory conditions through connected health tools.”

“We are about to enter a new phase of sleep research and sleep understanding,” says Malhotra, also immediate past president of the American Thoracic Society, “using big data to improve patients’ well-being.”

Mick Farrell, ResMed CEO, says, “This unprecedented amount of data enables predictive analytics to help physicians and providers better manage patients’ sleep apnea and COPD therapy, and ultimately improve their overall health. Reaching one billion nights is about more than just big data; it’s a testament to how the adoption and meaningful use of technology benefits patients, physicians, and providers everywhere, and we couldn’t be more pleased to start 2017 with this exciting news—this is just the beginning!”

More than 3 million patients being monitored by AirView, more than 200,000 diagnostic tests processed in ResMed’s cloud, and more than 1,000 patients per day signing up for myAir to track their own therapy use on ResMed Air10 devices.

Sleep centers are also excited about ResMed’s milestone and the general advancement of remote monitoring.

Original Source:

http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2017/01/resmed-reaches-one-billionth-night-sleep-monitored/

ResMed New Record: One Billion Nights of Sleep Data Monitored

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sleep and seasonal affective disorder

Newly Discovered Gene Links Sleep and Seasonal Affective Disorder

A poor night’s sleep is enough to put anyone in a bad mood, and although scientists have long suspected a link between mood and sleep, the molecular basis of this connection remained a mystery. Now, new research has found several rare genetic mutations on the same gene that definitively connect the two.

Sleep goes hand-in-hand with mood. People suffering from depression and mania, for example, frequently have altered sleeping patterns, as do those with seasonal affective disorder (SAD). And although no one knows exactly how these changes come about, in SAD sufferers they are influenced by changes in light exposure, the brain’s time-keeping cue.

Although a number of tantalizing leads have linked the circadian clock to mood, there is “no definitive factor that proves causality or indicates the direction of the relationship,” says Michael McCarthy, a neurobiologist at the San Diego Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center and the University of California (UC), San Diego.

To see whether they could establish a link between the circadian clock, sleep, and mood, scientists in the new study looked at the genetics of a family that suffers from SAD and advanced sleep phase. The scientists screened the family for mutations in key genes involved in the circadian clock, and identified two rare variants of the PERIOD3 (PER3) gene in members suffering from SAD and advanced sleep phase.

“We found a genetic change in people who have both seasonal affective disorder and the morning lark trait” says lead researcher Ying-Hui Fu, a neuroscientist at UC San Francisco. When the team tested for these mutations in DNA samples from the general population, they found that they were extremely rare, appearing in less than 1% of samples.

Fu and her team then created mice that carried the novel genetic variants. “PER3’s role in mood regulation has never been demonstrated directly before,” she says. “Our results indicate that PER3 might function in helping us adjust to seasonal changes,” by modifying the body’s internal clock.

“The identification of a mutation in PER3with such a strong effect on mood is remarkable,” McCarthy says. “It suggests an important role for the circadian clock in determining mood.”

The next step will be to investigate how well these results generalize to other people suffering from mood and sleep disorders.

Original Source:

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/02/scientists-identify-molecular-link-between-sleep-and-mood

Newly Discovered Gene Links Sleep and Seasonal Affective Disorder

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narcolepsy and weight gain

Narcolepsy and Weight Gain Linked to Hormone Deficiency

People with narcolepsy are prone to weight gain and are often overweight. Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive sleepiness, but the new findings suggest it can also increase weight gain. The findings further unveil that even if narcoleptics consume less than those without the condition, they are still prone to weight gain.

Deficiency in Orexin

The researchers found that deficiency in a hormone – known as orexin – may be to blame, as it encourages hunger and wakefulness, leaving individuals with a lack of energy-burning brown fat. The findings suggest that orexin-targeted weight loss therapies may help narcoleptics and others who are overweight.

There are two types of fat: white and brown. White fat stores calories, whereas brown fat works to burn calories by generating heat.

The evidence found in mice suggests that orexin is crucial for the formation of mature brown fat, but with minimal orexin, brown fat activity drops. Mice injected with orexin showed substantial fat loss. The findings also reveal that those with minimal brown fat are essentially predisposed from birth to live an overweight life, as their bodies simply do not have the mechanisms to burn fat like others with more brown fat.

There are ways to naturally promote brown fat, for example, spending time in the cold. But the study suggests, orexin-specific treatments may help those struggling to lose weight as well.

Original Source:

http://www.belmarrahealth.com/people-with-narcolepsy-are-prone-to-weight-gain-often-overweight/

Narcolepsy and Weight Gain Linked to Hormone Deficiency

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