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sleep calculator

The ‘Lost Sleep Calculator’ Reveals How Sleep Deprived You Are

Think you’re getting  enough sleep? You might want to think again because this test will make you realize how much sleep you’re actually missing.

The new tool, The Lost Sleep Calculator will reveal your sleep loss to show your weekly, monthly, yearly and even lifetime deprivation, as well as what else you could have done in that time.

The tool also reveals how many hours people have been kept awake thinking about various things, such as food, work and sex.

Visitors to the site are asked to input their age and how many hours of sleep they got during the night before.

 


The team at the interior brand Hillarys.co.uk are behind the Lost Sleep Calculator.

A spokesperson for the site who created the tool said: ‘Many of us get into that competitive tiredness debate, where we feel like we are far more tired than our partner or peers and are far more stressed.

‘It’s commonplace to complain of feeling like a zombie, but are we really as sleep deprived as we think?’

Original Source:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4105982/How-sleep-deprived-Fascinating-new-tool-reveals-just-tired-really-prepare-shocked.html

The ‘Lost Sleep Calculator’ Reveals How Sleep Deprived You Are

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sleeping with pets

Can Sleeping with Pets Improve Quality of Sleep?

Can sleeping with pets help you get a better night’s rest? Singular Sleep, a national sleep medicine practice, attempts to uncover the answer.

“There have been some small studies in the past that looked at this issue, but nothing on this scale,” says Joseph Krainin, MD, Singular Sleep’s founder and a board-certified sleep medicine physician, in a release. “Anecdotally, I had noticed that a large percentage of my patients admitted to having pets in the bedroom. Consequently, it became something that I asked about routinely during evaluations.”

According to Krainin, the new survey was inspired by a 2015 Mayo Clinic study. Using social media, Singular Sleep conducted an extensive campaign to recruit participants, and received more than 1,000 survey responses from around the globe. The survey included more questions than the Mayo Clinic study and led to several interesting new findings, including:

  • 87.5% of respondents who had pets in the bedroom allowed their pets to sleep in bed with them.
  • Almost 60% reported that their pets either had no effect or beneficial effects on their sleep, a significantly higher percentage than the prior study.
  • About a quarter of those surveyed (24.1%) reported worse sleep due to pets.
  • 16.7% were unsure whether pets affected their sleep.
  • 71.6% more people with bed partners reported worse sleep with pets in the bed than those without bed partners.
  • 32% more people without bed partners reported better sleep with pets in the bed than those without bed partners.

“For those without a steady bed partner, our results suggest that pets may provide a comforting effect,” Krainin notes. “I used to get exasperated trying to convince insomniacs to remove their pets from the bedroom. But with this new data, I’m going to, as they say, let sleeping dogs lie.”

Original Source:

http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2016/12/study-yields-surprising-results-pets-affect-sleep-quality/

Can Sleeping with Pets Improve Quality of Sleep?

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snoring partner

Sleep Woes – How to Cope and Deal with a Snoring Partner

Snoring is one of the most common complaints we hear from spouses and partners that live together. It can cause sleep problems not only for snorers, but for everyone around them as well. Fortunately, snoring is not a hopeless case.

Before we talk about ways to cope and deal with a snoring partner, we must first acknowledge that snoring is often an indication of sleep apnea. This life-threatening condition is associated with a snoring pattern that includes moments where breathing and snoring stop until the sleeper is jolted back to semi-wakefulness and the pattern starts again.  If your partner is a snorer, direct them to our Sleep Health Assessment so that they can understand their sleep disorder risk level and get help.

Here are steps you can take to cope with and handle a snoring partner:

1. Make Sure You Are Sleeping On A High Quality Mattress

You may be surprised to know that sleeping on a low quality mattress can actually be the cause of your partner’s snoring! If your mattress is old and sags in the middle, this will affect the position of your partner’s neck when they are asleep, blocking their airway in the throat. Once you’ve got a nice, high quality mattress, remember to raise your bed up by about four inches. Doing this will help keep throat tissues and the tongue from plugging up your partner’s airway, greatly reducing the chances of them snoring throughout the night.  This is one way to cope with a snoring partner.

2. A Weighty Issue

Unfortunately, snoring tends to be more prevalent in those who are overweight as they tend to have bulky throat tissue. If your snoring partner is above their ideal weight, this could be one of the reasons they are keeping you up at night. The good news, however, is that this is completely reversible. Encourage your snoring partner to adopt a healthy eating and exercise plan in order to shed the excess kilos.

3. Stay Away From The Booze

Do you ever notice that your partner’s snoring gets even worse after a night out to the bar? This is because alcohol relaxes the muscles around the throat, making everything, well, floppier. The floppier muscles are around the airway, the greater the constriction for air to flow through. Avoiding alcohol in the evening or prior to bedtime can often lead to a much more peaceful night’s sleep for both you and your partner.

4. Where There Is Smoke, There Is a Snoring Partner

Smoking can cause or worsen a bad case of snoring. Cigarette smoke has the ability to swells the mucous membranes of the throat. In addition to this, it limits your oxygen intake to the lungs. If that is not bad enough, smoking can also cause blockages to form in the nose and throat. All of these are factors that can lead directly to snoring. If your partner is a smoker, encourage them to quit the habit, or purchase them nicotine patches as an alternative to smoking cigarettes.

5. Stay Well Hydrated

Many people are unaware to the fact that being dehydrated can actually cause one to snore at night. Secretions in your nose and soft palate become stickier when you’re dehydrated, which can directly cause a person to snore more. Healthy women should guzzle down about 2.5 litres of total water (both from all drinks and food) a day; whilst men require about 4 litres of water a day.

Sleep Woes – How to Cope and Deal with a Snoring Partner

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take sleep aids

Is It Safe to Take Sleep Aids During Long Haul Flights?

Should you take sleep aids on a flight? According to Aneesa Das, M.D., a sleep medicine specialist at the Ohio State University, you can skip medication if you’re only on a short trip (just stay awake instead), and reserve it for those overnight flights when you’re jumping across multiple time zones. Some pills are stronger than others, and some have side effects that may outweigh the extra sleep. Here’s what to know about three common medications.

Ambien

Ambien—the most powerful option on this list and the only one that requires an Rx—works as asedative-hypnotic medication that slows your brain activity to make you feel very sleepy. Some users experience retroactive amnesia, which means you could wake up mid-flight, have a full conversation with the flight attendant, and have no memory of it when morning comes, Das says. Ambien can also lead to sleepwalking. But it’s not all bad. Zolpidem (the generic name for Ambien) has been shown to fight off jet lag, finds a study published in Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine.

Tylenol PM

The over-the-counter medication is easy to pick up at the drugstore. Diphenhydramine, the same antihistamine found in Benadryl, will likely put you to sleep, though you may pay the price once you land. “It makes us feel really groggy when we wake up, and it can make us feel really hungover,” Das says. The antihistamine may also leave you with a dry mouth. Still, Das says it’s okay to take so long as you’ve tolerated it in the past.

Melatonin

The hormone occurs naturally in the body, but taking an extra dose helps induce sleep and adjust your circadian clock. Start taking melatonin a few days before your trip, about four to six hours before your bedtime, so that you’re ready to hit the pillow 30 minutes to an hour earlier than normal, Das says. A review from U.K. researchers found melatonin decreases jet lag if you take it close to your target bedtime at your destination, especially if you’re traveling across five or more time zones. The researchers found doses of .5 and 5 milligrams were equally effective at preventing jet lag, though the larger (maximum) dose will help you fall asleep quicker and sleep better. Another plus? There are no major side effects to worry about. (Note: The FDA does regulate dietary supplements such as melatonin, but these regulations are less strict than those for prescription or over-the-counter medications; check with your doctor for an appropriate recommendation.)

If you decide to take sleep aids, make sure to follow the ground rules. First, give it a test run at home. “You want to know how your body tolerates it before you go,” Das says. Then, once you’re settled into your seat, pass on booze and don’t pop the medicine until the flight attendants have gone over safety instructions.

Original Source:

http://www.cntraveler.com/story/should-you-take-sleeping-pills-on-a-flight

Is It Safe to Take Sleep Aids During Long Haul Flights?

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sleep apnea and depression

The Link Between Sleep Apnea and Depression

More than 25 million people in the United States have sleep apnea, which interrupts a person’s breathing while they sleep.

Sleep apnea has been linked to increase the risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

However all the health risk of untreated sleep apnea isn’t all physical. There have also been studies that suggest if sleep apnea isn’t properly treated, it can increase the risk of depression.

In an interview with FOX 17, Dr. Daniel Herrick, a sleep medicine physician with Spectrum Health Medical Group, talked about the connection between sleep apnea and sleep depression.

Symptoms of depression are extremely common in people who have obstructive sleep apnea. One study suggests that as much as 73 percent of people with sleep apnea also suffer with depression.

People who suffer from sleep apnea related depression will have all the symptoms of sleep apnea like snoring, gasping, stopping breathing, and feeling tired or having little energy. However, they’ll also have symptoms that come with depression such as feelings of hopelessness, feeling like a failure, loss of appetite, irritability, restless sleep and excessive sleepiness.

The best way to treat sleep apnea is to talk with a health care provider, and get tested for the appropriate treatments.

Original source:

http://fox17online.com/2016/11/28/connection-between-depression-and-sleep-apnea/

The Link Between Sleep Apnea and Depression

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